Dangote starts pre-testing of his $2 billion fertiliser plant in Lagos - one of the world's biggest projects in the fertiliser industry

Aliko Dangote during a visit to the fertilizer plant under construction in Lagos State. Credit: ANDREW ESIEBO FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK
  • Dangote fertiliser plant commences pre-testing ahead of full-scale production and launching of the $2 billion Granulated Urea Fertiliser complex.
  • The plant, owned by Africa's richest man, is projected to be one of the largest plants (at one location) in the world's fertiliser industry.
  • Devakumar Edwin, the Group Executive Director at Dangote Industries Limited, says Nigeria would be able to save $500 million from import substitution and provide $400 million from exports of products from the plant.

Africa's richest man, Aliko Dangote's fertiliser plant, has commenced pre-testing ahead of full-scale production and launching of the $2 billion Granulated Urea Fertiliser complex.

The plant complex, located in the Dangote Free Zone in Lekki, Lagos, has been described as 'wonder of the world' and one of the largest plants (at one location) in the world's fertiliser industry.

It is expected to be commissioned in the first quarter of 2020, has a production capacity of 3 million tonnes per annum, and will create thousands of direct and direct jobs when full production kicked off.

In a statement issued on Tuesday, February 25th, 2020, the management of Dangote Fertilizer Limited said the plant is currently going through pre-testing as all the section such as Central Control Room, Ammonia and Urea Bulk Storage, Cooling Tower, Power Generator Plant, and Granulation Plant, have been completed.

The Nigerian Gas Company (NGC) and Chevron Nigeria Limited (CNL) under the Gas Sale and Purchase Agreement are already supplying 70 million standard cubic feet per day (scf/d) of natural gas to the factory.

Devakumar Edwin, the Group Executive Director, Strategy, Portfolio Development and Capital Projects, Dangote Industries Limited, said Nigeria would be able to save $500 million from import substitution and provide $400 million from exports of products from the fertiliser plant.

“The supply of fertiliser from the plant will be enough for the Nigerian market and neighbouring countries.

“I am happy that by the time our plant is fully commissioned, the country will become self-sufficient in fertiliser production and even have the capacity to export the products to other African countries. Right now, farmers are forced to utilise whatever fertiliser that is available as they have no choice; but we need to know that the fertiliser that will work in one state may not be suitable in another state, as they may not have the same soil type and composition. The same fertiliser you use for sorghum may not be the fertiliser you will use for sugar cane,” he added.

The size of the plant is said to be twice that of Eleme petrochemicals in Rivers, Nigeria.

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