The Metropolitan Archbishop of Accra has defended President Akufo-Addo’s has said that there is nothing wrong with President Nana Akufo-Addo’s comments on homosexuality during an interview with Al Jazeera.

President Nana Akufo-Addo told Aljazeera that legalisation of homosexuality is bound to happen in Ghana if public opinion for its legalisation grows stronger.

“I don’t believe that in Ghana, so far, a sufficiently strong coalition has emerged which is having that impact on public opinion that will say: ‘Change it [the law], let’s then have a new paradigm in Ghana."

“I think it is something that is bound to happen like elsewhere in the world, they are activities of individuals of groups”, he said.

When asked: “What’s going to provoke it, what’s going to make it happen?” Akufo-Addo said: “Oh, like elsewhere in the world, the activities of individuals [and] groups”.

The president, however, pointed out that: “At the moment, I don’t feel and I don’t see that in Ghana, there is that strong current of opinion that will say: ‘This is something that we need even deal with’. It’s not, so far, a matter which is on the agenda.”

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However, Nana Akufo-Addo’s comments did not go down well with many Ghanaians, who feel that his comments suggest an endorsement of homosexuality.

But speaking to Accra-based Joy FM, Charles Palmer-Buckle said the president’s response was right since he was only stressing on Ghana’s cultural reality as it relates to homosexuality.

The Metropolitan Archbishop of Accra said the 1992 Constitution considers the practice an offence so there is no argument about that.

“The President is not God, he cannot say that Ghana will never accept it. He said culturally, it is not an issue that Ghanaians will accept," he said.

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Palmer-Buckle explained that the Catholic Church believes that homosexuals are also children of God “just like the murderer and heterosexual” and therefore their rights have to be defended.

"I don't think people listened very carefully to the President before they jumped to a conclusion," he said.