Lawyer ditches 'native doctor' outfit, says 'I'm led by spirit'

The human rights lawyer caused quite a stir last week when he attended a Supreme Court proceeding donned in a native doctor-like attire.

Human rights lawyer, Malcolm Omoirhobo. [Twitter:@Florence_Esq]

A human rights activist and lawyer, Malcolm Omirhobo, has ditched his signature African traditional worshipper-like attire for normal lawyer's dress code.

Omirhobo hit the headlines last Thursday when he sauntered into a Supreme Court session decked out in his black lawyer gown, wearing a gourd with cowries around his neck and a red wrapper tied around his waist.

He told the press at the Supreme Court that his choice of clothing was an expression of his fundamental human rights as prescribed by a recent judgement of the Supreme Court which permits all Nigerians to showcase their way of worship and the use of hijab in schools and public places.

However, when he appeared before Justice Tijani Ringim on Monday, June 27, 2022, wearing the same 'native doctor' attire, the Judge declined to hear his case before the court.

Was this the reason why he appeared at the Federal High Court in Lagos on Wednesday morning in full wig, gown, black trousers and shoes?

Omirhobo noted that "the spirit" asked him to "go normal", adding that he would revert to his religious regalia again if so directed, The Punch reports.

Responding to to enquiries from journalists, the activist said, “I’m led by the spirit to go normal today. Don’t be surprised if you see me the other way tomorrow. So, today is normal.”

When asked if "the spirit" directive wasn't in conflict with the ethics of the legal profession and dress code, Omirhobo said, “What ethics are you talking about? Are you insulting my religion? Don’t try it, don’t insult my religion. The constitution, according to the Supreme Court, says I should dress according to my religious attire and you are insulting the Supreme Court, behave yourself.”

He maintained that he's a traditionalist and justified his decision with the Supreme Court judgement which ruled in favour of Muslim students wearing hijab in Lagos schools.

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