Legal profession, not gold mine – Chief Justice to new lawyers

The Chief Justice, Kwasi Anin Yeboah, has called on new lawyers to hasten slowly as they go about discharging their duties in the Legal Profession.

Lawyers

According to the CJ, the legal profession is not a gold mine, where practitioners will use their advantage at the expense of the rules.

Justice Anin Yeboah made this called during the induction of some new lawyers.

“I wish to remind you from the outset that the distinguished profession you are joining is a demanding one that requires a firm commitment to excellence underpinned by an unbending at the Bar zeal for hard work.

“Your success cannot be perceived in purely monetary and material terms only and I say this with great emphasis because the legal profession is not a gold mine,” the CJ noted.

“So hasten slowly and learn, bearing in mind that those who work well while abiding by the ethics of the profession reap the rewards of a good harvest.”

To buttress his point, the CJ said, “more enduring success is one that derives from professional values and work that impacts positively on society as a whole, particularly, on the lives of the underprivileged, the poor and the voiceless.”

Avail yourselves of Legal aid services

While making Biblical allusion to remind them of what the Bible says in Proverbs 31 verse 8, the CJ quoted, “Open your mouth for the speechless, in the cause of all who are appointed to die”.

The CJ also urged them to “take Court assigned briefs to help the needy,” saying “Do not let the Legal Aid Commission be denied of your services as young practitioners.”

“With years of practice, dedication, and commitment, particularly, under the tutelage and supervision of a senior legal practitioner, you will not only learn the procedures of the court and the fine nuances of the law, but also you will receive a good foundation to the practice of law.”

Call to BAR not the end of education

Justice Anin Yeboah advised the new lawyers to erase the “erroneous assumption” that the call to the Bar is the end of their legal education.

“This is false because even though the Call is the ultimate which initiates the practice of law, it is imperative that you avail yourselves to every opportunity for regular and continuous legal education as this is the only way to keep abreast of the changes in law,” the CJ urged.

“It would also be beneficial if you should take advantage of any training programmes in procedural and substantive law for legal practitioners.”

The Chief Justice said, the COVID-19 pandemic has ushered the world into new ways of conducting business which he said, provides an advantage for them to join training programmes remotely to benefit from the knowledge thereof in order to present their cases better before the Courts.

Observe Legal profession etiquette

The CJ said, “You owe a duty to the courts in which you will be practicing and I urge you as young Lawyers, to be mindful of courtroom language and etiquette.

“Avoid the use of indecent, indecorous, and intemperate language, the show of arrogance, self-importance, and other undesirable attitudes.

“Your conduct in and out of court must always be guided by the Legal Profession Rules, 1969 which prescribe the acceptable professional conduct and etiquette for all lawyers in Ghana. Avoid the application of improper and unwholesome methods to procure justice for your client.

He said, as practitioners, “you should not disregard the professional charging fees by overcharging your clients, especially for services that have not even been rendered. The rules frown on touting and so you must desist from that.”

He added; “You must prepare very well for every brief you are handed and pursue it assiduously in court. You must respect client-lawyer confidentiality. Do not mislead the court in your advocacy by acting in a way that damages the reputation of the profession.”

JOIN OUR PULSE COMMUNITY!

Unblock notifications in browser settings.

Eyewitness? Submit your stories now via social or:

Email: eyewitness@pulse.com.gh