ADVERTISEMENT

Beat the Heat: How to spot and treat heat rash

When the weather gets hot, we get uncomfortable.

Spot and treat heat rash [Shutterstock]

Heat rash can be a bit of a nuisance, especially with the current heat wave, but with this guide, you can spot it, and treat it.

Heat rash, also known as prickly heat, happens when your sweat gets trapped under your skin because of blocked sweat ducts. This can cause small blisters or red bumps that feel itchy or prickly, hence the name.

ADVERTISEMENT

So, how can you tell if you have heat rash? Look out for these signs:

  • Red bumps on your skin, especially in places covered by clothes.
  • A prickly or itchy feeling on the affected area.
  • Small blisters in severe cases.

Heat rash usually appears on the neck, chest, groin, or elbow creases - places where sweat can easily get trapped.

If you find yourself with heat rash, don't worry! Here are some simple steps to help your skin cool down and heal:

ADVERTISEMENT

Cool down: The first thing to do is get out of the heat. Find a shady spot or go indoors where it's cooler.

Loose clothing: Wear loose, breathable clothing. Cotton is great because it lets your skin breathe and doesn't trap heat.

Cool baths or showers: Taking a cool bath or shower can help soothe your skin. Just pat your skin dry gently afterwards - don't rub!

Calamine lotion: Applying calamine lotion can relieve itching and discomfort.

Stay dry: Try to keep the affected area dry. More moisture can worsen heat rash.

ADVERTISEMENT

Prevention is always better than cure, right? Here are some tips to keep heat rash at bay:

  1. Wear light, loose-fitting clothes made of cotton.
  2. Spend less time in the hot sun, especially during the hottest part of the day.
  3. Use fans or air conditioning to keep cool.
  4. Take cool showers or baths to lower your body temperature.

Heat rash usually gets better on its own, but sometimes you might need to see a doctor. If the rash doesn't improve after a few days, gets infected (look out for increased pain, swelling, redness, or warmth), or if you get a fever, it's time to get medical help.

ADVERTISEMENT

This content was created with the help of an AI model and verified by the writer.

Enhance Your Pulse News Experience!

Get rewards worth up to $20 when selected to participate in our exclusive focus group. Your input will help us to make informed decisions that align with your needs and preferences.

I've got feedback!

JOIN OUR PULSE COMMUNITY!

Unblock notifications in browser settings.
ADVERTISEMENT

Eyewitness? Submit your stories now via social or:

Email: eyewitness@pulse.com.gh

ADVERTISEMENT