According to her, effective December 7, if she wins the presidential election, there is no way Jehovah's Witness members will work in the government sector during her regime.

She explained that it beats her imagination how a group of people whose religious principles frown on voting to elect a government will eventually benefit from that government after others have voted to form it.

Akua Donkor said this in an interview with Kofi Adoma, stressing that the religious group must not reap where they did not sow.

“When I become president, no member from the Jehovah's Witnesses will be allowed to have government work, you don’t want to vote, who should vote for you to go and work at the government office,” she questioned.

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She was quick to add that that Jehovah's Witnesses are free to work in the private sector such as trading and farming, but in her view, it is completely nonsensical to employ them in the government sector since they do not vote.

“All members of the Jehovah's Witness will go to the market and trade,” Akua Donkor stated.

She formed the Ghana Freedom Party in 2016 and attempted participating in that year’s election but was disqualified because she could not meet the requirements set out by the Electoral Commission.

However, fortunately, the woman perceived to have a lot of sense of humour has found a space on the 2020 presidential election ballot paper, and she is already giving a hint of how high-handed she will be if given the mandate to govern the country.

While her position might make sense to some people, others might take her on for making a divisive comment unbecoming of someone putting herself up for the position of president.

Ghana is a democratic state where freedom of religion and association are enshrined in its 1992 constitution, so no individual or group of individuals must suffer any form of discrimination as a result of their religious association.