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Many in the African diaspora who left their home countries to pursue higher education and opportunities abroad are now returning home to build up the places that are closest to their hearts.

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Mohammed Mijindadi , Sales & Market Development Director in charge of Sub-Saharan Africa for GE’s Power Generation Products (PGP) business.

Many in the African diaspora who left their home countries to pursue higher education and opportunities abroad are now returning home to build up the places that are closest to their hearts.

Since the 1970s, millions of people have moved abroad to study, work and advance their lives. Nigeria was one of the countries most impacted by this shift, but the tide is now turning. Nigeria has become Africa’s biggest economy, and many of the same workers who moved abroad are returning to put their skills to use in their home countries, including Mohammed Mijindadi

Over the past decade, Nigeria has maintained an impressive growth rate of approximately 7 per cent, according to the African Economic Outlook. Many are hoping to capitalise on this growth opportunity while making a difference in the country that they know and love.

Mohammed moved to Philadelphia in the United States in 2001, at a time when Nigeria was facing increasing instability in its education sector, and obtained a degree in civil engineering from Temple University.

His background and previous adversity motivated him to work harder to gain education and work opportunities. “As a minority, I had to work four times as hard to keep up with or get ahead of my peers,” he continued. “But that in itself was a great challenge that really pushed me to continue to succeed.”

Mohammed’s relentless drive brought him great reward. After graduating from Temple University, he received an MBA from Penn State and then joined GE in the company’s Experienced Commercial Leadership Program (ECLP).

After spending 10 years in the U.S., Mohammed felt the need to return home. “The U.S. was very different from Nigeria, and I missed the family-structured communities of my home country. When the opportunity arose to execute a large rail project in Nigeria, I raised my hand for the job. Even though I was an ECLP with less than two years’ experience, GE gave me a chance.”

Mohammed is delighted to bring his expertise to his home country and make a lasting impact on the infrastructure in Nigeria. He has found his return home inspiring. “I am amazed by how the people of Nigeria continue to thrive amidst uncertainty. There is a contagious hunger to constantly adapt and develop strategy to meet the ever changing needs of the region.”

Mohammed hopes that at least a few of his peers from the U.S. will consider returning to Nigeria to make a lasting business impact. “I’m able to interact with the most senior executives and government officials, while having a real, measurable impact on the lives of millions of people,” he says.

GE Reports Africa

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