Smart Healthcare; Building hospitals around technology, not the other way around

Each hospital project helps shape GE’s approach and execution plan for future projects. After each project is complete, the team evaluates the project to understand what worked well and how things could potentially have been done differently.

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play Set to open in 2016, the 192-bed paediatric hospital will provide specialised medical care for children.
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There is no uniform solution when it comes to hospital design. Hospitals are considered one of the most complex types of buildings to develop, with the infrastructure strongly impacting how the hospital functions. Upfront meticulous planning is essential as the needs of each hospital function must be carefully balanced to optimise efficiency and services.

It takes a cross-industry team of experts to design a hospital. Specialists who understand the various types of patient care, the technologies required and how to control the spread of infection. These specialists work together as a team, carefully planning the final design well before the ground is broken.

Clinical Engineer Stefan Ludick is one such expert. As a customer project manager with GE Healthcare Solutions Africa, he immerses himself in the project as the initiation phase commences. “Our team gets involved in the design phase. We build the hospital around the equipment rather than the other way around,” said Stefan. “If you consider that an MRI machine weighs more than five tonnes, you need to  make 100 per cent sure that all structural requirements are met before delivering the MRI unit. If the hospital does not meet the required specifications, it can cause major problems, not only for  the customer, but for GE as well. 

play Stefan is also part of GE’s team working on the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital in Johannesburg. “This is one of  the most prestigious projects that I have had the honour of working on,” said Stefan.

 

Stefan is currently involved in some of GE’s healthcare modernisation & revitalization projects underway in KenyaNigeria, Angola and South Africa. He thrives on managing large-scale hospital projects, such as the 92 Hospital Project in Angola in partnership with a Spanish packager and the Ministry of Health. 

Stefan is also part of GE’s team working on the Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital in Johannesburg. “This is one of  the most prestigious projects that I have had the honour of working on,” said Stefan. “It’s incredible to witness former South African President Nelson Mandela’s dream turn into a reality.”

Set to open in 2016, the 192-bed paediatric hospital will provide specialised medical care for children. “As one of the key technology providers, GE will equip the entire radiology department, installing the very best radiology and digital imaging technology available,” Stefan said.

Stefan says he is continuously learning. He explains that each hospital project helps shape GE’s approach and execution plan for future projects. After each project is complete, the team evaluates the project to understand what worked well and how things could potentially have been done differently.

“At the opening of the hospital, there is nothing more rewarding than when you see your customer smile. This is when you realise we have exceeded our customer’s expectations and also the impact the hospital will make on the country’s healthcare services” said Stefan.

For more info on General Electric's endeavors in Africa visit:- http://www.gereportsafrica.com

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