The court ruled that the NIA’s registration isn’t in conflict with President Akufo-Addo’s directive to halt all public gatherings.

According to the court, the NIA’s decision to go ahead with the registration is not against the President’s directive suspending all public gatherings.

The Judge, Justice Anthony Oppong explained that the directive did not stop operations of businesses but rather asked operators to observe certain protocols including social distancing.

Criminologist, Prof Ken Agyemang Attafuah
Criminologist, Prof Ken Agyemang Attafuah

Kevow Mark-Oliver and Emmanuel Akumatey Okrah sued the NIA and succeeded in securing an interlocutory injunction preventing the NIA from going ahead with the exercise.

The NIA suspended the Ghana Card registration exercise in the Eastern Region due to the injunction.

The exercise was suspended “pending the final determination of the application,” the NIA noted in a statement.

The Commission on Human Rights and Administrative Justice (CHRAJ), for example, said the continuation of the registration was a breach of international and regional human rights instruments.

CHRAJ in a statement also said the NIA’s actions were a disregard of the existing World Health Organization (WHO) precautionary measures aimed at containing and combating the novel coronavirus.