The beneficiaries are Dr. Matthew Opoku Prempeh, Sarah Adwoa Safo, and Ignatius Baffour Awuah, among others.

Some government appointees, Members of Parliament, lecturers, heads of institutions and some media practitioners benefited from the scheme meant for needy-but-brilliant students.

Dr. Opoku Prempeh is listed as a Harvard University student-sponsored for the programme National and International Security, receiving US$11,200 and US$12,800 as tuition and living allowance respectively.

The Procurement Minister is also listed as a Harvard Kennedy School student who received US$17,004 as tuition fees and US$12,800 as a living allowance.

GETFund beneficiaries
GETFund beneficiaries

Baffour Awuah is listed by the report as a student of the University of Portsmouth, UK, studying BA International Relations and Politics, and enjoying £11,800 as tuition fees and £12,710 as a living allowance.

The audit report concluded that the failings of the GETFund led to brilliant-but-needy students being deprived of scholarship in favour of politicians.

"GETFund did not establish any systems, policies, and procedures to ensure the economic, efficient and effective use of public funds," the report stated.

Ignatius Baffour-Awuah
Ignatius Baffour-Awuah

The purpose of the audit was to ascertain whether GETFund acted in accordance with its mandate as stated in the GETFund Act, 2000 (Act 581) with regards to the administration of funds for scholarships. The audit covered the period 2012 to 2018.

3. We found that in 2009, GETFund Secretariat curtailed scholarship funding to the Scholarship Secretariat contrary to Section 2(2b) of the GETFund Act, 2000 (Act 581) and rather purportedly administered scholarships under Section 2(2e) of the Act. In granting scholarships, GETFund Secretariat did not institute a robust selection process from 2012 to 2017 leading to haphazard granting of scholarships to Ghanaians to the

iii |Performance Audit Report of the Auditor-General on the Administration of Scholarships by GETFund detriment of those who really needed it. GETFund Secretariat did not also follow the requirements of the Financial Administration Act, 2003, (Act 654) to establish systems, policies, and procedures to ensure the efficient and effective use of public funds. In so doing, GETFund Secretariat did not efficiently expend GH¢1.8 million of public funds from 2012 to 2018.

Here's the full document of the audit report on GETFund.