Gabby Asare Otchere-Darko, a former Executive Director and Founder of Danquah Institute, has defended the appointments of the 998

He said President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo never promised to run a lean government.

Many Ghanaians continue to criticize Nana Addo for the appointments of ministers, deputy ministers and Presidential Staffers, which they say is putting unnecessary strain on the economy when he presented a list of 998 current staffers and ministers of state at the presidency to Parliament for purposes of accountability.

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The list, which is for the period January 7, 2017 to December 31, 2017 is in line with the constitution and the Presidential Office Act 1993 which enjoins the Presidency to annually brief Parliament on the list of persons who work at the Presidency.

The list shows that there are a total of 998 people currently working in various positions at the Presidency.

These include ministers of state at the presidency, persons working directly at the office of the president, senior presidential advisers, presidential staffers, and presidential aides and employees of other Public Services assigned to the Office of the President.

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But Gabby in a Facebook post said "Akufo-Addo has never put lean government before a government that delivers. I recall in 2006, we were working on a speech and when I mentioned ‘lean government’, he told me point blankly that our situation in Ghana calls more for a well-resourced government machinery that can deliver. To drum home the point, he said the whole of Brong Ahafo had one senior prosecutor when he was appointed AG. “The consequences of that is the delay and denial of justice to both the accused and victims of crime. I want to focus on the delivery machinery, on results.” I don’t think he has changed. None of his 3 Manifestos stressed on the concept of small government. To him the capacity and ability to deliver is what matters most. Competent delivery is, after all, cost effective."