The fear of Nuclear powered energy is one that has lingered on the minds of many, especially in Africa, and has been identified as a major reason for the continent’s reluctance to adopt nuclear energy.

This is despite the fact that many prominent individuals in the industry have come forward to allay such fears.

The Head of Laboratory at the National Research, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Vladimir Golovkov is of the view that the fear of nuclear energy is a psychological hurdle which needs to be overcome.

He said:

“Each technology has advantages and disadvantages……atomic energy is free from dangerous pollutants. It is absolutely clear from environmental pollution. Russia has a great deal of experience in the exploration of atomic energy and it’s use. It (atomic energy) is not dangerous in terms of environments pollution and health in general. So I think that using atomic energy has great potential. The fear of using atomic energy is mainly in our minds.”

Mr Golovkov added that:

“Atomic energy is one of the great possibilities to overcome the distance in the absence of enough amount of electricity with minimal amount of effort.this because there is the possibility to generate huge amount of electricity from small nuclear power plants. Nuclear power plants presents a promising future in Africa.”

Mr Vladimir Golovkov was speaking to the winners of a video competition organized by Rosatom in Russia.

Winners of the video contest dubbed “Atoms Empowering Africa” arrived in Moscow on November 19, for the tour which included  a visit to one of Russia’s Nuclear Power Plants  which is equipped with VVER nuclear reactor, as well as a journey to the first City of Science.

The 4th annual youth video competition was devoted to the potential of nuclear power to help bolster Africa’s economic and social development. Students and young professionals from all Sub-Saharan African countries were invited to participate in the competition that begun in June this year. For the first time in the history of the contest, the contest was supported by the African Young Generation in Nuclear (AYGN), South African Network for Education in Nuclear Science and Technology (SAN-NEST) and South African Institute of Electrical Engineers (SAIEE).