Election 2016 NPP agitated over EC's directive on asset declaration

A statement released, Tuesday, September 27, 2016, by the EC and signed by its Director of Communications, Eric Dzakpasu said: "candidates are to take note of the requirement to declare their assets to the Auditor General in order to meet the eligibility criteria."

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John Boadu

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The New Patriotic Party has raised concerns with a new directive by the Electoral Commission which demands presidential and parliamentary aspirants to declare their assets as part of their eligibility criteria.

A statement released, Tuesday, September 27, 2016, by the EC and signed by its Director of Communications, Eric Dzakpasu said: "candidates are to take note of the requirement to declare their assets to the Auditor General in order to meet the eligibility criteria."

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“Candidates are to take note of the requirement under law to ensure that their tax obligations are met in full or the need to make satisfactory arrangements in respect of tax obligations with the appropriate Authority,” the statement added.

Section 1 of Act 550 of the Assets Declaration and Disqualification Act 1998 states;

"A person who holds a public office mentioned in section 3 of this Act shall submit to the Auditor-General a written declaration of-

(a) all properties or assets owned by him; and

(b) all liabilities owed by him; whether directly or indirectly.

But the Acting General Secretary of the NPP, John Boadu who is against the directive was at the EC office on Wednesday to demand answers.

According to him, when a person is elected and about to take office in Parliament or the presidency, that person must show evidence of his asset declaration form before and after his tenure of office.

He also expressed misgivings with the timing of the release given for candidates to complete their forms and submit to the EC, Accra-based Joy FM reports.

But the EC has since justified the directive, saying it is in accordance with the law.

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