For many trying to manage their weight, Easter holidays can be a bit frightening.

There is no denying the fact that holidays are times for enjoyment and merry-making, however, they also tend out to be an occasion for overeating.

1.  Reisterstown native Barbara Borcik:

Borcik is a nutritionist and diabetes educator. He said it is important to have a plan for food before the celebrations.

Of course you must enjoy yourself, but you must make sure you don't overeat in the process.

"It is a holiday and you are going to get together with your friends and family, so you want to, first and foremost, go to enjoy yourself.This may be one day where you depart from your given schedule," she said.

2.  Be mindful of what you eat:

There's nothing wrong with enjoying the foods being offered, but you must try to be moderate about it. According to Borcik, a good way to maintain a good food balance is to be mindful of what's going on your plate.

"One good tip is when you're plating your food, half your plate should be fruits and vegetables," she added.

3.  Avoid eating around the buffet table, as this would increase your chances of overeating:

"Select your food and move away from the table. Go to another part of the house to eat so that you're not going back for more if the food's right in front of you," Borcik advises.

What is more, you are advised to select a smaller plate to avoid overeating during such events.

4.  Be careful about the drinks you choose to accompany a meal:

This is to enable you reduce the likelihood of taking in more calories. Borcik advises that you "select water, perhaps water with ice, maybe with fresh lemon or lime, as a beverage as opposed to fruit juices or sodas."

5.  Be mindful about the ingredients you use in preparing your food during this period:

Your aim is cut down on fats and other unhealthier ingredients.

"Add less fat to the product or use reduced fat products - reduced fat mayo instead of regular, or reduced fat cheese instead of regular - and you could always work on not adding so much to it," Borcik added.